Confidentiality

The Rivers School supports confidential student access to school counselors. This means that students can schedule appointments with the counselors without parent/guardian permission, and counselors will meet with students to help them manage life’s challenges. School counselors will always encourage students to communicate openly with their families, but will not mandate, communicate, or break confidentiality unless there are imminent risks to the student’s safety or the safety of others. 

  • School counselors, along with all Rivers School faculty and staff members, are considered mandated reporters and are required to disclose information that impacts the safety and/or well-being of any student. Rivers employees are required to report possible child abuse or neglect to the Department of Children and Families (DCF), in consultation with the wellness team.
  • School counselors may disclose student information to caregivers if they have reasonable cause to believe that breaking confidentiality is necessary to avert a clear and present danger to the health, safety, or welfare of the student, others in the school, and/or greater community (i.e., if student indicates imminent threat of harm to self or others).

Collaboration

There are times when it is wise to use a team approach to better serve the student. With the student’s consent and permission, this may include working closely with caregivers, teachers, and administrators in coordinating care for cases that require short-term accommodations or other support. 

  • Examples of situations in which sharing of information may be useful: 
    • Sharing information with the head or assistant head of school, advisor, dean(s), and/or the student’s teacher(s) in order to support the student’s academic performance or progress
    • Sharing information with the student’s caregivers to help them support the student at home
    • Asking the student/family to sign a collaboration release form that allows the school counselor to communicate with outpatient therapists, psychiatrists, or other health professionals whom the student sees outside of school